On that Rolling Stone Article…

Aside from the introduction (and interview with Dzhokzar’s wrestling coach), there wasn’t much new information in Rolling Stone’s cover story ‘THE BOMBER’. Because the article doesn’t include citations, I’m going through to cite where information in the article may have first appeared. The whole piece feels like a missed opportunity: a bunch of previously reported pieces of the story assembled in a more linear fashion doesn’t reveal much of anything, at least in my opinion.

Rolling Stone: “On Senior Night, the last home match of the season, every Rindge senior wrestler is asked to bring a parent or relative to walk them onto the gym floor to receive a flower and have their picture taken. Jahar brought no one. “We had one of the coaches walk him out to get his flower,” says Payack. This, too, didn’t seem to bother Jahar – and even if it did, he never mentioned it. “With our friends, you don’t need to confide in them to be close to them,” says Jackson.”

New York Times, May 4th: “On the night of Mr. Tsarnaev’s last match, Mr. Payack said, “one of the coaches walked him out. No father, no brother, nothing.”

Sports Illustrated, April 21st: Dzhokhar never had family attend any of his matches, Payack said. On senior night, Dzhokhar walked out with one of the coaches when most of his teammates did so with a parent or relative.

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A few minutes later, we are sitting in The Black Lion pub. Her jet-lagged two-month-old son Harvey is dozing in a pushchair, having been up until 5am the night before. Smith, too, proves amenable. She is supposed not to like interviews (let alone photo shoots), but ranges freely, from hip-hop to drone strikes, providing me with a long list of new writers I must read and TV I must watch. ‘Are you watching Game of Thrones?’ she says. ‘That is a masterpiece. The last episode, after it finished, we just sat in the dark for half an hour… Literary novelists would do well to learn to plot from these people.’ Every writer she knows in New York is writing a TV series, apparently. (via The world according to Zadie Smith - ES Magazine - Life & Style - London Evening Standard)

A few minutes later, we are sitting in The Black Lion pub. Her jet-lagged two-month-old son Harvey is dozing in a pushchair, having been up until 5am the night before. Smith, too, proves amenable. She is supposed not to like interviews (let alone photo shoots), but ranges freely, from hip-hop to drone strikes, providing me with a long list of new writers I must read and TV I must watch. ‘Are you watching Game of Thrones?’ she says. ‘That is a masterpiece. The last episode, after it finished, we just sat in the dark for half an hour… Literary novelists would do well to learn to plot from these people.’ Every writer she knows in New York is writing a TV series, apparently. (via The world according to Zadie Smith - ES Magazine - Life & Style - London Evening Standard)

Source: standard.co.uk

PERETTI: Miranda, is there any way you could get Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Lena Dunham to send me Snapchats?

JULY: Well, I just learned what Snapchats are yesterday.

PERETTI: So it should be easy now! I’m just “Peretti” on Snapchat if Lena Dunham or Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is reading this. They can cut Miranda out.

Source: The New York Times

natashavc:

"She leads me up to the fourth floor, where a quadrant of suites are booked and handcuffed reporters will come and go all afternoon under the ironclad control of several Gomez handlers, including a grizzly-sized bodyguard who gives me a menacing once-over, as if pondering the best way to snap my neck in the event I accidentally blurt out a taboo query such as, “Selena, do you prefer Kierkegaard or Nietzsche?”
 
Operation DO NOT MENTION JUSTIN BEIBER / IT’S ALL ABOUT THE MUSIC YOU HAVE NOT HEARD

natashavc:

"She leads me up to the fourth floor, where a quadrant of suites are booked and handcuffed reporters will come and go all afternoon under the ironclad control of several Gomez handlers, including a grizzly-sized bodyguard who gives me a menacing once-over, as if pondering the best way to snap my neck in the event I accidentally blurt out a taboo query such as, “Selena, do you prefer Kierkegaard or Nietzsche?”

 

Operation DO NOT MENTION JUSTIN BEIBER / IT’S ALL ABOUT THE MUSIC YOU HAVE NOT HEARD

Source: natashavc

To recap: Don’s real name is Dick Whitman. His prostitute mother died in childbirth; his dad, her john, beat him. His fundamentalist stepmother called him a “whore’s child.” Then his father got kicked in the head by a horse, and the stepmother moved in with her sister, herself a prostitute, living in a brothel. The stepmother, heavily pregnant with Don’s half brother, prostituted herself to her brother-in-law, as the teen-age Don knelt outside her door. He watched them, through the keyhole, have sex. C’mon, now. This is no longer the backstory of a serial adulterer; it’s the backstory of a serial killer.

Source: newyorker.com

Gasol also has a broad range of intellectual and cultural interests. He has taught himself Italian and French to go along with his childhood languages of Catalan and Spanish plus English. He and Kobe Bryant speak to one another during games in Spanish to keep opponents from knowing their plans. Gasol also regularly reads historical novels, plays the works of French classical composers on his keyboard, and attends concerts and operas; he is a friend of Spanish tenor Plácido Domingo, and often visits him backstage after performances.

Source: Wikipedia

Lena Dunham by Claire Danes

  • The title of Lena Dunham’s HBO show blasts out in bold letters — GIRLS — filling the screen to its edges. Like Lena herself, there’s nothing coy about it. She reclaims the often pejorative “girls” as she does countless other ideas. Her character, Hannah, says she has covered herself in tattoos to gain authority, or authorship, over her body. Lena bares that tattooed body throughout the series, making it clear that it is hers to share. Lena’s power lies largely in her self-awareness and wit. Like all great comics, she has a joke ready to deflect any jeer. Hannah’s pathetic declaration that she could at least be “a voice of a generation” invites and thwarts many a poisoned arrow. Lena’s true power, though, lies in her transparency. She is unflinchingly, unnervingly honest. She exposes, beneath all that bare skin, a multitude of shortcomings: acute self-involvement, obsessive-compulsive behavior, overeating, oversharing. Hannah is as vivid and raw a portrait as we have seen — nails bitten to the nub — and despite her glaring faults, we ravenously embrace her. Lena’s unique lack of vanity or shame allows us to consider that we may also be able to accept and express ourselves fully. This is not only impressive, it’s important. Because it turns out that girls don’t just want to have fun. They also want to be known for who they really are.
  • Danes, an award-winning actress, stars in Homeland

Source: TIME

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